Real Estate Glossary

Our glossary is the largest dictionary of real estate and construction terms on the Internet with almost 10,000 definitions.
Real Estate Glossary
Our glossary is the largest dictionary of real estate and construction terms on the Internet with almost 10,000 definitions.



 
Ca - Cal - Car - Cas - Ce - Cen - Ch - Cho - Cle - Co

Col - Com - Con - Cond - Cont - Coo - Cos - Cr - Cro - Cu


Stovetop generally constructed without integral oven(s). Cooktops can have conventional gas or electric burners or a smooth ceramic surface with heating elements below.

Fluid used to remove heat as from an internal combustion engine. Fluid used for cooling.

1. A container, room or any device used to cool things or to keep them cool.
2. A refrigerant.
3. Anything that cools, for example, a drink.

Nail used for drywall.

Cooling towers are used to remove heat from the water or to cool down equipment and are used in industries that require the cooling of water in large amounts, such as refineries and steam power plants. The two major types are natural or forced draft.

The time between multiple weld passes when heat is lost.

A small pen, cage or building used as an enclosed shelter for birds or small animals.

A real estate broker who finds a buyer for a property, which is listed, by another broker.

A corporation that owns housing units and whose tenants purchase shares in the corporation equivalent to the value of their housing unit.

Apartment building in which each resident owns a percentage share of the corporation that owns the building. Also called a co-op.

Business trust, which holds the title to a cooperative residential building and grants occupancy rights to shareholders in the corporation.

A loan related to a cooperative residential property.

A project where a corporation holds title and sells shares representing individual units to a buyer, who then receive a proprietary lease, rather than a deed, as title is given in a condominium.

Apartment building in which each resident owns a percentage share of the corporation that owns the building. Also called a cooperative apartment.

To cut to fit over or against a coping or molding with curves.

Joints that have two pieces purposely cut to fit together.

1. The top stone of a wall or building.
2. Stone used in or for a coping

1. Top layer of a masonry wall that is usually sloped to carry off water.
2. To shape a member, by cutting, to fit snugly against another member.

Saw that has a narrow, fine-toothed blade stretched across a U-shaped frame, which is used for cutting curved or scrolled outlines.

More than one object in the same plane.

A reddish-brown, moldable, ductile metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. Atomic Number 29. Atomic Weight 63.54. Atomic Symbol Cu.

Tubing or piping either thin Type M, medium Type L and heavy wall Type K, which can be either rigid, called Drawn Temperature Pipe or flexible, called Annealed Tubing, all of which is made from copper alloy. The outside diameters range from ¼ inch to 12 inches with connections made of compression fittings, solder joints and flare fittings with threaded joints normally used for piping.

Short bracket or block projecting from a wall, which provides support for a horizontal member.

Corbels that meet over a span.

1. A thick string or thin rope.
2. A rib on the surface of ribbed material.
3. A slender, flexible, insulated cable, which is fitted with a plug to connect something to an outlet.
4. A quantity of firewood measuring 4 feet deep by 4 feet high by 8 feet long.

Cords and ropes of a ship's rigging.

Screwdriver operating on a built-in, rechargeable battery so that no wired connection is necessary. There are also drill and saws that are cordless.

1. The central or innermost part of something.
2. Cylindrical section sample of the earth's strata obtained by drilling.
3. Board to which an outer layer of veneer is attached.
4. A mass of iron which is placed inside a wire coil to channel and increase the strength of the magnetic field resulting from current in the coil.
5. Gypsum, between the facing and backing papers, in a wallboard panel.

One-inch thick gypsum board made to fit between the wallboard panels of a self-supporting gypsum wall, by being held at the top and bottom in a metal channel. Gypsum facing panels are then fastened to the coreboard by use of adhesive and screws.

Masonry units that have longitudinal holes which run the length of the unit.

A hollow drill that can be used to remove sections of material.

Wire form solder that has a center core of flux.

The middle section of a built-up panel of wood.

Trade name used by makers of a synthetic marble-like material made of a type of plastic called methyl methylacrylate.

The light, thick, elastic outer bark of an oak tree.

1. Tree or shrub that has porous wood.
2. Leitneria Floridana, Latin name of a small deciduous tree or shrub with light, porous wood.

Point at which two walls join each other at an angle.

Reinforcement, usually of metal, placed in a corner where two walls intersect.

Wooden block which is used in an inside corner of a cabinet to reinforce the joint.

Exterior trim used at the corners of a house to protect the ends of siding.

1. Diagonal bracing used at the corners of a frame structure, across the studs, to support the frame.
2. Metal strap that reinforces corner joints and is bent at right angles.

A chisel which can cut both sides of a recessed right angle simultaneously because it has two straight cutting edges which meet at a point to form a right angle.

Clamp, which is specifically designed to hold members that are joined at an angle, in place.

Effect on the value of property due to the fact that it is situated on or near a corner.

A piece of property bounded by two intersecting roads and having frontage on each.

Lath of metal mesh which adds strength to corners in plaster walls.

1. Fence post used when a fence changes direction.
2. Lumber support for a wall corner.

Wire or metal reinforcement for plaster walls, which is concealed, by the plaster.

1. Masonry block or stone that forms part of the corner, at the base. It is often inscribed with information about the building, can contain a vault and is usually dedicated at a ceremony.
2. The essential or most important part. The foundation of anything.

Box or other durable receptacle which is used to hold items in the vault that is often built into the cornerstone of a new building.

Tool, which allows application of plaster to adjacent sides of a corner, simultaneously.

1. Decorative horizontal molding that projects from the top of a wall.
2. Lower section of the roof forming an overhang. Also called an eave, a cornice is composed of a fascia, soffit and soffit molding. With hip roofs the cornice is continuous around the sides. With gable roofs, it is on the long sides. The word eave comes from the Old English word "off", meaning over.

Cornice with rafter ends covered by the fascia and soffit.

Also referred or as a flush cornice, it has no rafter projection beyond the walls.

Also referred to as closed or close cornice, it has no rafter projection beyond the walls.

Cornice with no fascia board attached to the ends of the rafters.

The part of the trim overhang that are installed around the ends of gable roofs.

1. A circular chandelier that hangs from the ceiling of a church.
2. The top projection of a cornice, which is used to deflect rain away from the building.
3. Anything crown shaped.

A sometimes glowing discharge on the surface of one or more conductors, which results from a buildup of excess electrons on a conductive surface at high voltage, a partial electric breakdown in a gas, as in the air surrounding a wire at high potential.

Also called a corporation cock or corporation stop, this plug-like valve controls the flow of water from a main line to a branch line.

Arrangement for employers to pay for the transfer and move of employees.

Business organized as a distinct legal entity with ownership evidenced by shares of stock.

Plug-like valve that controls the flow of water from a main line to a branch line.

Right to substantive real or personal property having tangible body and form.

A substantive body of evidence; the actual tangible fact in a given situation.

Deed issued to correct errors made in another deed.

Necessary repairs to remedy problems discovered by a home inspection.

A long passageway or hall, providing access to another area.

The gradual wearing away of a metal by rusting or chemical usage.

Causing chemical deterioration. Alternately, sarcastic and biting language.

Surface that is shaped into parallel grooves and ridges. To furrow. To make wrinkles.

Also called a corrugated staple, this smaller rectangular fastener has one sharp edge that strengthens the joint by being placed across and hammered into the wood.

A sheet of iron or steel that is galvanized and corrugated to give it strength and corrosion resistance.

Steel pipe, which is made by rolling and welding, corrugated sheet steel.

Paper corrugated to be sturdy, used in packing.

Siding made out of aluminum or plastic derivatives having ridges and valleys and is attached to the sides of buildings.

Also called a corrugated fastener, this smaller rectangular fastener has one sharp edge that strengthens the joint by being placed across and hammered into the wood.

A sheet of steel, which is galvanized and corrugated to give it strength and corrosion resistance.

The parallel ridges or grooves that make a corrugated surface.

Return to Top