Home Seller's Guide - closer look at...

10 Improvement Projects for Sellers
The goal with pre-sale improvements is to make the greatest possible impact with the smallest investment.

Each of these ten projects can be completed at a reasonable cost - and all contribute considerably to a home's curb appeal and salability.

Interior painting
A fresh coat of paint can really brighten the interior of your home at a reasonable cost - especially if you do the job yourself. Choose neutral, popular colors that will appeal to most buyers.
Exterior painting
An old, peeling coat of exterior paint can really ruin the curb appeal of your home - and turn off potential buyers before they even get through the door. A new paint job can work wonders to restore a home's outward appearance.
Repairs
You will probably have to repair any broken or malfunctioning household systems before you close anyway - so why not do it upfront before the problems detract from your sales effort?
Refinish wood floors.
Damaged or stained wood floors can really make a home look shabby, but with a relatively inexpensive refinishing job they can look as good as new.
Quick kitchen fixes.
The kitchen is a critically important part of your home to most buyers. A dated or unfashionable kitchen can really hurt a home in the marketplace. While a full (and expensive) kitchen remodel is unfeasible, any small and inexpensive projects that jazz up the room are probably a good idea. Painting cabinets, replacing hardware, changing faucets, and installing new flooring are all reasonably priced projects that can make a huge difference in the look of your kitchen.
Replace old linoleum floors.
If your kitchen (or laundry room or bath) has old or unattractive linoleum it may be worth replacing the flooring. The cost is generally reasonable and the impact on the room can be significant.
Add landscaping.
Installing some well selected plantings can really improve the look or your yard and curb appeal of your home. Avoid costly projects involving earthmoving or extensive plantings. Instead, select shrubs that will look their best during the anticipated selling period. If the time of year permits, choose plants that will be in bloom when buyers are viewing the home.
Lighting maintenance.
Check all of the lighting fixtures in your home and replace any that are not working or are dated and unattractive. Make sure all fixtures have working bulbs and that all light switches are in operating order.
Fix "sticky" doors.
Check all of your interior doors. Do they open easily and close all the way? If not, have them planed or adjusted so they function properly.
Fix "sticky" windows.
Check all of your windows. Do they open and close easily? Do they lock properly? Are there any cracks or broken panes? Fix any problems and make sure that all windows have screens.

Do It Yourself?
Most of these projects can be tackled by a reasonably handy homeowner. But even if you can do the work yourself, should you? If you will be selling one home and buying another - and all the while maintaining your usual pace - you may find that you don't have the time. It probably doesn't make a lot of sense to delay your move for an extended period while you try to find the time to finish a small project.